Cartoonishly Large Hats Are All the Rage Right Now. Here's Why

2022-12-03 19:47:28 By : Ms. Joy Xu

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The lids, which come from a brand called... Noggin Boss... retail for $75. knitting sets

Noggin Boss founders Gabe Cooper and Sean Starner started the company in 2019, but saw their first success in March 2022, when the duo appeared on popular investment TV show Shark Tank. "We love all things sports and the rush of repping our teams," they said during their 30-second intro. "We know many people considering being a fan somewhat of a lifestyle, but with little innovation in the arena of sports and promotional apparel in decades, it's time to shake things up."

And shake things up, they did. As the "judges" — in this case, investors — awaited the grand reveal, paid models appeared from the corridor behind them, dressed in cartoonishly large baseball caps. Reminiscent of the Pablo Sanchez character from 1997's Backyard Baseball video game, their average size heads were dwarfed by bulbous crowns and massive brims. The giant hats, Cooper and Starner explained, are their pride and joy — promotional apparel they promise will get you noticed, whether on the jumbotron at a football game or by fellow fans at a lively tailgate.

BIG GAME, BIG HAT: After rushing for a career-high 105 yards, rookie @BrianR_4 breaks out the big hat, and we mean big! B-Rob says he's helping promote his friend who makes big hats - "If ya'll want one, let me know"@nbcwashington #HTTC pic.twitter.com/KmxF988arL

Or, in the case of Washington Commanders running back Brian Robinson, by the journalists in the locker room after a Sunday matinee win against the Atlanta Falcons. He sported one with a giant "W" on the front — his teams logo, but also a nod to the game's outcome — which he was gifted by a family friend.

"If you want a big hat, let me know," he told reporters, implying he knew where he could get them one. And for a brief moment, many wondered — that was until they started spreading.

You see, Cooper and Starner went on Shark Tank to seek out an advisor — but also investment — that could make licensing professional sports logos more manageable. Until then, they'd forged few official partnerships and could only fulfill orders finished with custom logos — ones that the buyer had permission to reproduce.

The pair left the Tank with an offer from Daymond John, the founder and CEO of Fubu but also an investor in Bombas socks and a brand ambassador for Shopify. As evidenced by the Washington Commanders cap, John gave them what they needed: access to these coveted logos. Now, in the days since Robinson's viral post-game press conference, Noggin Boss hats are everywhere.

big hats are the new wave pic.twitter.com/LSac71zITa

Sales have skyrocketed more than 2,000 percent, the pair told the New York Post. Washington Capitals forward Evgeny Kuznetsov jokingly wore one; so did Orlando Magic guards Markelle Fultz and Jalen Suggs; and Scott Van Pelt rocked a custom one on ESPN. Sure, they all look ridiculous, but the hats do fit — and make for a funny Instagram post, if nothing else.

Golf Hat Right now, though, it seems you still can't buy a big hat with your favorite sports team on the front. You can choose from poorly made graphics that say "#1 Dad" or simple basketball clipart, but there's no Orlando Magic option, for example... at least not yet. But if the big hats get any bigger, expect to see endless options up on their site (and blocking your view at your next sporting event).